Illinois Labyrinths

Plano


Plano Centennial Labyrinth

Centennial Elementary School Growing Tomorrow's World Labyrinth - Design collaboration with Sue Anne Foster

As the centerpiece of the central courtyard at Centennial Elementary School, this magnificent classical labyrinth is based on a drawing entitled “The Healing Tree,” by Sue Ann Foster. Working in collaboration with Centennial’s staff, Marty modified the drawing to accommodate the site and the needs of the school community.

The labyrinth features a number of innovative components. The flagstone and granite entryway forms the trunk of the Healing Tree; its perfectly round canopy measures 30 feet in diameter. The crushed red granite path is 18 inches wide – large enough to accommodate group walks – and extends a total of 750 feet in length. The path boundaries are outlined with hand-painted paving stones designed by Centennial students. The center is crafted of hand-sculpted blue and green pavers in the image of the Earth. When not in use, the labyrinth becomes a decorative background and conversation piece for ceremonies and other events that take place in this multipurpose space.

Our family had a wonderful experience creating the Growing Tomorrow’s World Labyrinth with the staff, students, and parents at Centennial Elementary School, where Marty and our daughters, Brittany and Chloe, attended school.

We wanted to put our time and energy into this project because we feel so blessed to be on this labyrinth-creating journey. We feel truly honored to be a part of something that is much bigger than ourselves, and the opportunity to give back to the greater good felt right to us. But most of all, we did this because we believe that children are the future and that they are always a good investment.

Please visit the Spirit of the Labyrinth section of our website to read the entire story about the creation of the Growing Tomorrow’s World Labyrinth.

Yorkville


Five Petal Visica

Five Petal Vesica, Contemporary Creative Variation - Design collaboration with Alex Champion

Alex Champion, world renowned labyrinth maker and earthworks artist, traveled from his home in California to Illinois to assist Marty with creating one of his famous Vesica labyrinth designs. The pattern was drawn by Alex on the buff pavers and the blue inlay was hand cut by Marty and his 20-year friend/craftsman Jorge.

Yorkville


Yorkville Congregational Church Labyrinth

Yorkville Congregational Church Labyrinth

Labyrinth at YCC

Yorkville Congregational Church (YCC) is a creative and forward thinking church, and they don’t mind getting their hands dirty! Just look at what these volunteers, along with a small committee of folks called “Gods Gardeners” can do, with the guidance of Marty and Debi Kermeen.

First things first – educating the congregation, we gave our slide show and facilitated a labyrinth walk at the site where the labyrinth would be made. The space was blessed with song and prayer. The seed had been planted.

The committee went right to work selling and painting the pavers~ (small) Twinkie for $5, (squares) sandwiches $10, and (squares) loafs $15. Many painting parties were held at the church and in peoples homes with their families and friends.

During these months people continued the circle of life… through births, deaths, sadness and joy! They gathered and they painted. They used the art as a kind of therapy, expressing the way they feel about the people they love, earth, god, and peace. Souls were nourished and hearts were healed!

The painted bricks along with some blank bricks, were sorted, carried and placed on the lines. These included individual bricks with the word peace in over 50 different languages.

Earth Day 2010 – let the building begin… granite moving day, a huge pile of 15 tons of granite gets moved into the labyrinth. It was hand tamped for compaction!

The church invites people from not only their own community but from surrounding communities to come and walk the labyrinth. They plan to offer walks to honor everything from the changing of the seasons to International Peace Day!

Yorkville


Double Spiral Labyrinth

Double Spiral Labyrinth, Contemporary Creative Variation (Photo by Jeff Saward)

The gold spiral is made from Iowa limestone and the charcoal spiral is created from New York bluestone. All of the pieces were hand cut by Marty and his crew to create the images needed to inlay this labyrinth artwork. Marty explains his feelings about this design: “Each spiral is independently graceful, however the two spirals working together as a team become much more than either one of the spirals could be alone.

Plano


Homestead Labyrinth Full Grown

The Homestead B&B, Labyrinth and Hedge Maze created by Labyrinths in Stone

Plano Homestead Labyrinth

Homestead B&B Labyrinth

Design collaboration with Jeff Saward and Marty Kermeen

The Lewis Steward House, commonly called “The Homestead,” was built in 1854 and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Architecturally patterned on the picturesque Italian county cottages that are reminiscent of rural Tuscan villas, the house was expanded in the early 1860s and again in the late 1870s. It remained in the Steward family until 1954. The home sat vacant for three years, until Dr. Stefen Wojtowycz and his wife Olena purchased the home and modernized it for the late 1950s.

Langguth Design Ltd. purchased The Homestead in May 2003 and renovated the house to be used as a bed and breakfast, a decorator’s show house, and a special event facility for intimate weddings, family gatherings, corporate meetings and retreats. The two-acre estate is unique in that it features an outdoor sculpture gallery and a labyrinth surrounded by a beautiful planted hedge maze.

Homestead Labyrinth Wedding

The labyrinth is created with buff lines, the path pavers are a red/brown blend. The guests stand on the charcoal perimeter as the bride and groom are in the center of the labyrinth, facilitating a “wedding in the round.” The labyrinth is a 5-circuit original design by Jeff.

Plano


Dancing Lady Labyrinth

Dancing Lady Labyrinth, Private Residence (Photo by Jeff Saward)

When our business began to change its focus from commercial to spiritual ventures, we decided that we needed to create a labyrinth in our yard to walk on a regular basis. We set out to create a design that would fit our lovely wooded lot, and we came up with the Dancing Lady Garden Labyrinth. At that time, Marty was experimenting with different materials to create a variety of textures for his stone sculptures. We both wanted a natural look for the labyrinth, so we chose to use solid granite boulders for the path boundaries, softened by mulch-lined paths and planting beds.

Goddess In The Snow

Those who walked her paths find the Dancing Lady Garden Labyrinth to be both gentle and nurturing. She measures 39 feet in diameter, and the path is 20 inches wide. The design features a female shape of a woman – an angel or a goddess – whose hair and arms form the 5 circuits of the labyrinth. This image of the Snow covered Dancing Lady Labyrinth, is a reminder of the stillness and of the wildness that is there, dormant just waiting for spring to come again.

Tinley Park


St. Xavier University Celtic Cross

Celtic Cross, St. Xavier University South Campus, Tinley Park, IL - Design collaboration with Jeff Saward (Photo by Jeff Saward)

Aurora


Contemporary Creative Variation

The Illinois Math and Science Academy Golden Labyrinth, Contemporary Creative Variation

Illinois Math and Science Academy Golden Labyrinth

School Labyrinth, built by Marty Kermeen, Design collaboration with Jeff Saward

IMSA Labyrinth Border

The Illinois Math and Science Academy was created to help gifted high school students reach their full potential. We wanted to create something special for the students to demonstrate the interaction of both math and science. So we decided to incorporate the Fibonacci sequence or (golden rectangle). Colored pavers were used to create the 1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13 sequence. Also if you look closely you can see a golden spiral that Marty Kermeen hand carved into the pavers. In addition, as a border around the outside of this beautiful six circuit labyrinth, we used alternating colors of pavers to encode the Fibonacci sequence, in one band of pavers and the prime number sequence in the next.

IMSA Labyrinth Full

The pattern of this labyrinth was based on a design found in an eleventh century manuscript from Abingdon, England, where it is described as a plan of the sevenfold heaven.

It was a pleasure collaborating with my friend Jeff Saward on this unique project.

Dekalb


DeKalb Community Labyrinth

University of Northern Illinois Art Museum, Museum Without Walls Project, DeKalb Community Labyrinth, Huntley Park

Marty Kermeen was the featured brick artist for this Labyrinth work of art.  As the year 2000 approached, many communities wanted to commemorate the new millennium with something historically significant – a landmark that would hold hope and promise for the future and could be enjoyed by all members of the community. The DeKalb Community Labyrinth serves as such a marker, a place where the entire community can gather to slow down, listen, and reflect amidst the greenery of Huntley Park.

This stunning red and charcoal paver labyrinth features an 11-circuit stylized Chartres design with lunations. The labyrinth is 53 feet in diameter, and the path is 18 3/4 inches wide, extending a total of 1,250 feet in length. A Serenity Garden, Phase II of the project, will feature attractive landscaping with trees, bushes, flowers, and benches. A walkway leading up to the labyrinth will be paved with commemorative engraved bricks from the Buy-A-Brick Program (see our fundraising section on website.)

The DeKalb Community Labyrinth and Serenity Garden is a multifaceted project designed to educate the community about labyrinths and encourage community involvement. The educational programs included a labyrinth workshop, the creation of several temporary

labyrinths in parks and schools, and a year-long labyrinth lecture series sponsored by the NIU Art Museum and the Illinois Humanities Council. Community volunteers also assisted with the construction of the labyrinth’s containment ring.

This Museum Without Walls project was the collaborative endeavor of the DeKalb Park District, the Northern Illinois University Art Museum, the NIU Campus Activity Board Fine Arts Committee, and the DeKalb community.

Dekalb


Museum Without Walls Project The Living Labyrinth

University of Northern Illinois Art Museum, Museum Without Walls Project, The Living Labyrinth constructed by Marty and Debi Kermeen with help of the art students and staff.

To commemorate the new millennium, the NIU Art Museum’s Museum Without Walls Program Committee wanted to commission a work of art that would hold hope and promise of a brilliant future for the university and the people of DeKalb. We envisioned The Living Labyrinth, a beautiful and interactive work of art sculpted in the fertile soil of the community. Abloom with daffodils planted by the DeKalb Garden Club, this Classical turf labyrinth is located in the large courtyard adjacent to the NIU Art Museum.

The labyrinth is 60 feet in diameter, and the sod path is 2 1/2 feet wide. Students and faculty from the Art Department spent a day removing sod to form the labyrinthís seven circuits. The Living Labyrinth Project involved a variety of events to educate the community about labyrinths and to encourage broad-based support: a labyrinth workshop, the creation of several temporary labyrinths in parks and schools, and a year-long labyrinth lecture series sponsored by the NIU Art Museum and the Illinois Humanities Council.

The Museum Without Walls project was the collaborative endeavor of the DeKalb Park District, the DeKalb Garden Club, the NIU Art Museum, the NIU Art Department, the NIU Campus Activity Board Fine Arts Committee, and the DeKalb community.  Marty and Debi Kermeen of Labyrinths in Stone worked with the students and the staff to create this lovely project.

Libertyville


Dromenon Labyrinth

Dromenon Labyrinth, Private Residence

Located on the Pritzker Estate, this newly completed labyrinth is nestled in a forest full of wildlife, which is often seen walking the paths. The Pritzker family built the labyrinth for their own personal use, although it also receives frequent visits by guests from around the world, including the Dalai Lama.

Featured in the foreground are the Lannon stones that form the path boundaries of this stately labyrinth. A stylized version of the Chartres pattern called a Dromenon, the labyrinth is 80 feet in diameter, and the topsoil path is 2.5 feet wide, extending a total of 1,850 feet in length leading to a domed 12-inch crown in the center.

In addition, an elaborate underground piping system ensures proper drainage. When fully landscaped, the paths will be lined with lush green grass, and the planters will be full of colorful flowers and herbs.

The unique design and superb craftsmanship demonstrate why Labyrinths in Stone are unrivaled in labyrinth design and installation. We would be delighted to visit your home to design a labyrinth that is perfectly suited to the environment and your personal needs.

Oswego


Oswego Presbyterian Church Labyrinth

Oswego Presbyterian Church Labyrinth, built by Marty Kermeen of Labyrinths in Stone

Located in Oswego, Illinois, this labyrinth was created as a memorial with the monies raised from several groups within the Oswego Presbyterian Church. It is a 7-path Classic labyrinth design, modified to create a larger center space for group ceremonies. By placing the non-circular labyrinth into a circular format, this opens up an additional gathering space for groups before the walk begins. The 28 foot diameter labyrinth has buff paths and charcoal lines. It features a terra cotta gathering space completing the overall circular design. The unique diamond pattern around the perimeter also borders the sidewalk leading to this sacred prayer garden.

Urbana


Labyrinth at Crystal Lake Park

Crystal Lake Labyrinth

Carle Medical Foundation, Crystal Lake Labyrinth Built by Marty Kermeen of Labyrinths in Stone

Crystal Lake Labyrinth is located at the corner of Church Street and Orchard on the west end of Crystal Lake Park. It was created with community funds raised by the Baker Board, and with an additional donation from the Carle Foundation. This single winding brick path can be used for contemplation or quiet meditation. It is surrounded by a complementary garden that features beautiful landscaping, custom-designed seating and a €nger labyrinth for those who cannot walk it in the traditional manner. The garden was constructed with help from Parkland College horticulture students and staff.

Naperville


Naperville Labyrinth Overhead

Naperville Millenium Labyrinth, Riverwalk Park Built by Marty Kermeen Labyrinths in Stone

Naperville Millenium Labyrinth

(Photo by Charles Hopkins) Labyrinth Construction by Labyrinths in Stone

When the Naperville Riverwalk Commission was looking for ways to commemorate the arrival of the New Millennium, they sought a company that could make a beautiful space look even better. We are so very grateful that company was us… it started our labyrinthine path.

The Naperville Riverwalk, with the labyrinth as its centerpiece, is a multipurpose space that accommodates seating for large groups – perfect for community memorial labyrinth walks and public ceremonies.

Community members contributed to the success of the project in several important ways. Many chose to purchase engraved bricks used to construct the Millennium Wall. Others volunteered to build the labyrinth containment ring. Still others donated plantings and helped to landscape the site. However they chose to contribute to the project, the people of Naperville had a hand in creating their own landmark for generations to come. (Please visit the fundraising section of this website.)

Situated in Riverwalk Park at the base of an outdoor amphitheater cradled by 50-foot pine trees, this labyrinth embodies the spirit of its creator. More than 1,000 hours of painstaking labor were invested in creating this replica of the Chartres labyrinth. The labyrinth is 39 feet in diameter and the path is 12.5 inches wide, extending a total of 750 feet in length. The exacting detail of the lunations and rosette center was achieved with hand-sculpted pieces. In fact, more than 50 percent of the square concrete pavers were sculpted to fit the intricate design. A 40-foot containment ring and 3-inch crown facilitate proper drainage. The perfectly smooth surface allows for easy snow removal and handicapped accessibility.

The park is heavily used, averaging more than 3,000 visitors per day (during the summer months), many of whom walk the labyrinth. The overwhelming success of this labyrinth project was the result of extensive fundraising efforts on behalf of the Riverwalk Commission and many dedicated volunteers.

The superb craftsmanship exemplified by these and many other components of the Naperville Millennium Labyrinth earned us a First Place in Specialty Designs by Precast Concrete Pavement Awards in 1999.

Naperville


St. Thomas the Apostle Catholic Church Labyrinth

St. Thomas the Apostle Catholic Church Labyrinth Constructed by Marty Kermeen Labyrinths in Stone

Soon to be encompassed by a Meditation Garden, this labyrinth features square center petals, lunations, and path boundaries. The Millennium Meditation path is 14 inches wide, extending a total of 925 feet in length. Precision grading ensures proper drainage. The perfectly smooth surface allows for easy snow removal and handicapped accessibility.

A stylized version of the traditional Chartres labyrinth, the St. Thomas labyrinth combines the beauty of the original Chartres pattern with the economy of this trim new design. The pleasing simplicity of the paths, petals, and lunations makes this stunning labyrinth a much more affordable option, especially for non-profit organizations with budget restrictions.

The success of the Millennium Meditation Garden and Labyrinth project was the result of extensive fundraising efforts on behalf of the liturgical staff and parishioners of St. Thomas the Apostle Catholic Church. (Please view the fundraising section of this website.)

The parishioners of St. Thomas the Apostle Catholic Church contributed to the success of the labyrinth project in several important ways. Many chose to purchase “Create Your Own Steppingstones” that line the entryway to the labyrinth. Some chose to make larger contributions in the way of main entry columns and meditation benches. Others volunteered to build the labyrinth containment ring. And still others donated plantings and helped to landscape the site. However they chose to contribute to the project, the parishioners of St. Thomas the Apostle Catholic Church had a hand in creating their own landmark for generations to come.